Pascal’s Wager v. Freedom

Nobody can know anything

Are facts unknowable before death?

There was a time when politicians called attention to their party’s platform, predicting that its planks would benefit undecided voters. The obverse strategy, now in vogue, claims that the opposition candidate’s secret plans are an existential threat to the life and liberty of the voter being gulled, and to the future of all life on earth. Only the looter demanding your vote pretends to know anything. In its epistemology, the premise is that you cannot know the facts–not until AFTER you’re dead–so there is no point in trying. Instead, you should play it safe, obey, believe what the persuader is telling you.(link) Since the other premise is that you’ll be dead before you could possibly notice it’s a lie, as the conundrum is set up, you can only lose by disobeying the instruction to sacrifice knowledge and settle instead for belief.

screw the Bill of Rights!

No ABM! Freeze and Surrender!

This was the argument against the Second Amendment during the Cold War, and it persuaded Richard Nixon and his Republicans to betray the Bill of Rights. If Tricky were right, he’d be no worse off than Quisling or Petain.(link) If wrong, the communists assured him all life on Earth would end and it wouldn’t be their fault–all they ever do is initiate the use of force–just like Republicans. It was a slow-motion replay of the Molotov-Ribbendtop pact, but with America, not Poland, in the victim’s hood.

A similar gambit nowadays is the “argument” persuading 12-year-olds against generation of electric power, or persons innocent of mathematical sophistry against voting for candidates running on the Libertarian Party platform. Conservatism on both the fascist and communist sides seeks to keep the same decrepit parties in power, and crush new ones in the cradle lest their spoiler votes repeal tax laws.(link

13th Amendment Superhero

Energy Slaves, not Human Slaves!

Energy nihilists reject the R Bucky Fuller notion of energy as our working servant, and will settle for nothing less than a reversion to actual human slavery. Asking for evidence, of course, merely identifies you as an apostate, infidel, denier–precisely at this delicate juncture that is the tipping-point beyond which “Abandon All Hope” prevails.(link) This is unless you repent and believe that “Arbeit Macht Frei” and vote some looter ticket. Nevermind that its congregants do not know the definition of energy and are unsullied by any grasp of its dimensions or units of measure.(link) People who are against energy invariably favor coercion as the approach to problem-solving.

Nolan's wager

Vote for what you value, and that vote will help make it happen–with added interest!

Political nihilists are baffled by consistency. Your one vote in 133 million does nothing to change an election outcome–unless you leverage that vote by casting it for the Libertarian ticket. Then when a prohibitionist bigot loses by a smaller margin than the LP vote slice, a message is received. That candidate suddenly realizes that girl-bullying or ordering cops to shoot kids just cost an entire series of government paychecks.

Conversely, when libertarian spoiler votes cause some nonreligious totalitarian to lose to someone not in favor of higher taxes and collectivized rights charged to others at gunpoint, that message is not soon forgotten.(link) Losing, to activists in both looter parties, means not getting hired. To libertarians, winning is changing bad laws.(link)

All you have to do is vote honestly for legal policies you prefer and, if these are libertarian, your vote packs something like 20 times the law-changing clout. The Pascal’s Wager bluff did not make you surrender and fold your hand, but call and compare the strength or your convictions with fake kleptocracy premises, thereby raising the stakes by adding your own values to the table. This is a win-win approach to getting rid of bad laws.(link)

Find out the juicy details behind the mother of all economic collapses. Prohibition and The Crash–Cause and Effect in 1929 is available in two languages on Amazon Kindle, each at the cost of a pint of craft beer.

Brazilian blog