November 1929 News

Stopping the motor of Prohibition

Stock Market a smoking ruin! (link)

Who is Mabel Willebrandt? She was the Joan Galt of Prohibition who gave the looters exactly what they asked for in the year Ayn Rand was married to a U.S. citizen. Willebrandt had in August and September published “The Inside of Prohibition” as a column syndicated in 21 newspapers across the USA. In it she explained how the income tax was used to arrest drug and alcohol purveyors juries would not convict for prohibition violations. She also ripped the lid off of the Jones 5 and 10 Law (5 yrs on a chain gang and a fine worth 30 pounds of gold for having liquor) passed two days before Hoover swore to fine and imprison the entire U.S. population if that’s what it took to enforce it.

So on our way to page 12 to see if Willebrandt’s column on drug and beer agents with tommy guns will be mentioned or ignored, we see this gem:

Chain Gang - 30 pounds of gold fine for beer

Jones 5 and 10 Increased Penalties Law, 02 March 1929

This Senator Wesley Livsey Jones was the Pacific Northwest’s White Terror. His coastwise shipping law was a prohibition law in disguise, as it restricted who could operate vessels near U.S. coasts. But the Post-Crash article says nothing about Wesley Livsey Jones’ dry fanaticism. THAT went without saying. Now we come to the narc and taxMAN Hoover chose to replace America’s feminist prosecutor–now resigned from her dead-end job in disappointment.

Bring on the Depression!

Reasons to expect a Great Depression (link)

The article reports that…

Friends of the Administration describe Mr Youngquist as a firm believer in the dry cause. They also say his record as enforcement officer of Minnesota is excellent.
Besides enforcement of the Volstead Act, Mr Youngquist will have charge of enforcement of the internal revenue laws and the narcotic laws. He would have a much enlarged responsibility if and when the prohibition enforcement unit is transferred from the Treasury to the Justice Department.
Mr Youngquist was selected on recommendation of Attorney-General Mitchell and was among half a dozen men whom the President considered for the place. One of these is also believed to have been Hugh M Alcorn, State’s Attorney of Connecticut, but he was eliminated because of a disagreement among Republican leaders of Connecticut over his appointment.
Friend of Volstead
G.A. Youngquist… named to succeed Mrs Mabel Walker Willebrandt as Assistant Atorney General in charge of prohibition inforcement, is a close friend of Andrew Volstead and S.B. Kvale, in charge of prohbition in the northwest district.
Youngquist is 44 years old.

So the nation’s top prosecutor resigned, wrote a tell-all that explained how the Administration would topple the economy to exorcise the Demon Beer. Investors saw clearly that the economy would indeed be crushed and money fled banks and brokerages. The elevation of the most ruthless and fanatical Inquisitors, beginning with Younguist, fair-haired boy of the author of the Volstead prohibition law of The Night of January Sixteenth, began.

This was America’s Gestapo directing hordes of agents with holy crosses and service pistols to break in doors, tap phones, audit tax returns, arrest physicians and indict the worlds largest yeast, glucose, sugar and chocolate corporations on felony conspiracy charges. This is what PROMPTED the flight of money BEFORE the looting, torture, murder and imprisonment bulked up beginning in November of 1929.

Get the complete story in Prohibition and The Crash on Amazon Kindle in two languages

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Prohibition and The Crash, on Amazon Kindle

I also produce books and articles in Portuguese, using Brazilian historical sources at http://www.expatriotas.blogspot.com or amigra.us

 

 

The Five and Ten Law, March, 1929

Light beer (and even sauerkraut) became a major federal felony 24 hours before Herbert Hoover, a lifelong teetotaler, placed his hand upon a religious tome and became President. 

Chapter 42

The Five and Ten

 Senator Wesley Livsey Jones of Washington—possibly the most fanatical prohibitionist in the upper Chamber—again pressed for his year-old “increased penalties” plan on February 19.[1] “Be it enacted,” he proposed in his bill, “That wherever a penalty or penalties are prescribed in criminal prosecution by the National Prohibition Act, as amended and supplemented, for the illegal manufacture, sale, transportation, importation or exportation of intoxicating liquor, as defined by Section 1, Title II of the National Prohibition Act, the penalty imposed for each such offense shall be a fine not to exceed $10,000 or imprisonment not to exceed five years, or both.”[2] The national media dubbed it the Five & Ten, but the Chicago Tribune preferred to call it the Jones Law.

The gauntlet was thrown. Drys, championed by Senator William A. Borah of Idaho, hailed it as essential to maintaining a constitutional form of government. Wets, led by Senator James A. Reed of Missouri, classed it as improper, unjust and cruel, and on raged the debate. The Tribune compared it to the Fugitive Slave Law, but the Senate passed it anyway, albeit with the added proviso that “it is the intent of Congress that the court, in imposing sentence hereunder, should discriminate between casual or slight violations and habitual sales of intoxicating liquor, or attempts to commercialize violations of the law.”[3]

The House passed it as it stood, and President Calvin Coolidge signed it into law just twenty-four hours before an optimistic Herbert Hoover was to blithely take an oath to enforce it. But Hoover wouldn’t let it go at that. To this lynch mob atmosphere of hysteria he added: “Of the undoubted abuses which have grown up under the 18th amendment, part are due to (…) the failure of some States to accept their share of the responsibility for concurrent enforcement and to the failure of many State and local officials to accept the obligation under their oath of office zealously to enforce the laws. With the failures from these many causes has come a dangerous expansion in the criminal elements who have found enlarged opportunities for dealing in illegal liquor. (…) I have been selected by you to execute and enforce the laws of the country. (…) To those of criminal mind there can be no appeal but vigorous enforcement of the law. Fortunately they are but a small percentage of our people. Their activities must be stopped.”[4]

A delegation from the Women’s Christian Temperance Union was photographed on the White House lawn. Herbert Hoover had lunch with Assistant Attorney General Mabel Walker Willebrandt, then met with Senator Morris Sheppard of corn-producing Texas, author of the 18th Amendment. Time called Hoover the “Dry Hope,” and those first few days in office seemed to confirm exactly that. Bootleggers took no comfort whatsoever, and some of them began to wonder whether they’d overstayed the market.

An excerpt from Prohibition and the Crash, by JHenryPhillips.com    Available on Amazon Kindle in English and Portuguese.

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[1] (NYT 3/24/29 27)

[2] (Time Capsule 3/4/29 66)

[3] (CT 2/19/29 1, 3, 2/21/29 12)

[4] (Hoover 1929 1974 2-10)

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